Societies in focus

Dungeons and Dragons Club

Mid-way through the first term of this school year we started Dungeons and Dragons Club for the Lower School, and since have had quite a few members, mostly from Rems, drop in and out, with a core group who are consistently there every week, playing on a Monday and Tuesday lunchtime, even through lockdown over Google Classroom. I’ve been playing as the “Game Master (GM)” which means I have been keeping track of the story, using a premade adventure to create a world and plot for the player’s characters to navigate challenges. We’ve had Elven Wizards setting buildings full of giant spiders ablaze, Bards posing as red-cloaked gang members to take enemy organisations down from the inside, Halfling Rogues facing off against an evil necromancer and his horde of zombies and recently the group faced off with, and defeated, a green dragon, very narrowly surviving the battle.

“It’s been a fun experience, learning the rules of the game, and they’ve been problem solving and answering puzzles as well as working together to overcome obstacles in their way, and gaining new skills. The group have faced many challenges, defeating enemies with the aid of companions, or alone and now they are nearing the end of their adventure, we plan to continue playing throughout the summer holidays so that when the new school year comes around we will be able to start a new adventure with new characters and new challenges to face.” – Tristan Hooper, UMW

“I found the club to be amazing, it helped me learn about my creative side and form new bonds with people whom I had not known well before, the sessions are fun and welcoming, and the people there make the game very easy to understand, and overall it feels like a community.” – Harrison Hadley, RMN

Tristan Hooper

Physics Society

From the cosmos to fundamental particles, Physics Society seeks to tackle it all. However daunting that sounds, since its inception the relaxed and open-minded discussions have allowed for the collective fostering of curiosity in the field. Not only this, the Society serves as an outlet of the interesting laboratory and research work the KES and KEHS science community has produced. It has been the platform for talks delivered by numerous students on a variety of subjects from dark matter to everyday phenomena like the Mpemba effect. Members are also able to look forward to the regular participation of Old Edwardians, keen to share their experiences and accumulated wisdom from their time pursuing physics, engineering, and other such associated courses and careers; as shown by Saffron Pougher’s insightful explanation of Semiconductors, accompanied by an Oxbridge Engineering Q&A last week.

The study of physics is not a prerequisite for this society, merely an appreciation for the workings of the world around us – physics underpins all this. Whilst informative talks have been on the schedule these past few weeks, the Society is enthusiastic to take the plunge for the competitive ones abundant in the KES community. Join the final session of the term to experience both the eager intellectual pursuits as well as the cheery coterie that is Physics Society, in a challenge-style quiz round.

Oscillating between online and physical presence the society currently meets Tuesday after school, but will move to Wednesday lunch once school returns.

Junias Wong

Author: Tristan Hooper and Junias Wong